Slant *        6        Forum
Home Home Home
The Place to Go for Slant Six Info!
Click here to help support the Slant Six Forum upgrade!
It is currently Sun Sep 22, 2019 9:51 am

All times are UTC-07:00




Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 19 posts ]  Go to page 1 2 Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Wed Jun 15, 2016 6:58 pm 
Offline
Board Sponsor & Contributor

Joined: Thu Oct 31, 2002 5:39 pm
Posts: 23236
Location: North America
Car Model*:
Here's how to make your exterior lights and signals (other than headlamps, that's another post) work better:

Lenses and reflectors
Clean the lenses Remove the lamp assembly from the car. Cars up to '76 or so, give or take depending on model, mostly have brake/tail and park/turn lamps on which the lenses can be removed from the reflectors. With a medium-soft nylon-bristle brush, scrub the inside and outside of each lens with hot water that's sudsy with liquid dish soap. Inspect the lenses for cracking, chalking, crazing and fading. If red lenses appear pinkish or orangish when you hold them up to a strong light, instead of decidedly red, they need to be replaced. Some lenses are more prone to deterioration than others; the '66 Valiant and Barracuda lenses tend to turn to white dust and the '64 Valiant lenses tend to develop melt-divots just above the bulb. New lenses can be had for virtually all the old Mopars without too much difficulty or expense. If you need a cheap fix for faded lenses, go to a theatrical supply house and pick up a sheet of Roscolux #26. This is the material used in front of stage and movie-set lights. It's a transparent, flexible, thin plastic that's easily cut with scissors or a box knife -- use one of those tools to cut pieces of Roscolux to fit behind each faded lens.

Also clean the reflectors thoroughly, the same way (scrub with hot soapy water). Later-production cars have one-piece lens-and-reflector assemblies that can't be disassembled for cleaning and refurbishment. You can vigorously slosh hot soapy water in them and then rinse, and try to inspect the reflector. If it's dulled, your best move is to replace the assembly, though sometimes that's not possible or affordable. If you're clever you may figure out a way to disassemble it and then reassemble it satisfactorily.

Next, refurbish the reflecting surface of the reflectors. To do so, sand them as necessary, clean them with alcohol and then shoot them with "Chrome" or "Chrome Aluminum" spray paint from the hardware store. Do not use white paint, reflective tape, aluminum foil, mylar film, that high-cost paint that really does look exactly like chrome, or any other material. The plain ordinary hardware or parts store "Chrome" spray paint is virtually identical to the original material and so has the correct amount of diffusion; a mirror-shiny reflector is not what's wanted here.

Inspect the lens-to-reflector and housing-to-body gaskets. If they've deteriorated, new ones can be had from e.g. Gary Goers or DMT or other vendors.


Wiring and sockets
Inspect the sockets carefully. If the contacts have burned or corroded and/or the contact holder disc is rotten and/or the spring tension is no longer enough to hold the bulb securely, repair the socket. Socket repair pigtails (wire + spring + contacts + disc, easy to install) are available as follows (first number is NAPA Echlin, second number is Standard Motor Products):

LS 6451 or S60: Single contact w/rubber weatherseal
LS 6452 or S58: Double contact w/rubber weatherseal, holder disc index tab in line with contacts

LS 6226 or S23 : Single contact w/spring and backplate
LS 6228 or S24: Double contact w/spring and backplate, holder disc index tab in line with contacts
LS 6251 or S591: Double contact w/spring and backplate, holder disc index tab at 90° to contacts

Check the wiring, especially the grounds. It's very helpful to run a new main ground line from the engine compartment (battery negative, alternator housing, or attachment point of engine compartment ground strap) clear to the back of the car, where it can serve as the ground attachment point for all rear lights and other electrical stuff back there. You can pick up a lot of intensity and make the lamps come on much faster (shorter rise time for brake lights = more advance warning for following drivers) this way.

Bulbs
Original equipment bulbs on most pre-'66 cars was as follows:

1034: dual-filament park/turn and brake tail. Clear bulb for use with red rear or amber front lens.

1034A or 1034NA: dual-filament park/turn. Amber bulb for use with clear front lens.

1141 or 1073: single-filament bulb. Reversing/backup lights (and single-function—brake-only, turn-only—lights not frequently found on old Mopars).

About 1965, the 1034 was replaced by the 1157 and the 1073/1141 by the 1156. These 1150-series bulbs put out the same amount of light, but draw slightly more current and last quite a bit longer. When changing from 1034s to 1157s, often it was (and is) necessary to replace the turn signal flasher, because the original would flash too fast if used with 1157s. Nowtimes, it's difficult to find a flasher calibrated for 1034s.

So, what to use for upgrade bulbs? Well first, here's what NOT to use: 2057s! People sometimes assume that because it's a higher number, it's a brighter bulb. No. The difference between 1157 and 2057 is in the "minor" (dim parking or tail) filament. On the 2057, the dim filament produces 2 candlepower. On the 1157, the dim filament produces 3 candlepower. The difference doesn't sound like much, but it's very large as a percentage. Both 1157 and 2057 produce 32 candlepower from the bright (brake or turn) filament.

If you're sticking with incandescent filament bulbs, the best (by far) bulb you can use in place of 1034 or 1157 is a Honda (car, not motorcycle) part number 34906-SL0-A01. It draws the same amount of current as 1157, but is much more efficient. It produces 43 candlepower on the bright (brake or turn) filament, and 3.5 candlepower on the dim (tail or parking) filament. It also has a nickel-plated base that is much more corrosion resistant than the plain brass base of an 1157, so it's a lot less likely to corrode and freeze/stick in the socket. The single-filament version (best replacement for 1156, 1141 and 1073 in all applications *except* reversing/backup lights) is Honda p/n 34903-SF1-A01. It produces 45 candlepower. These bulbs are very expensive relative to the ordinary type, but they have a lot of premium technology and materials/build in them. Lifespan is double to triple, the workmanship is extremely good, and it's cheap insurance against a traffic crash. It's worth buying these as genuine Honda parts (very well made by Stanley); the aftermarket items packaged by Sylvania, Wagner, GE, etc are all poor-quality trinkets from China that burn dim and die young.

For backup/reverse lights, the best incandescent bulb is a № 796. It is a 35W halogen bulb that produces 62 candlepower, or about double the light of an 1156 and about triple the light of an 1141. The wattage increase is small (35W vs. 28W); the wires and lenses will not notice or care) and the filament is in the right place. Neither of these compliments can be said of those 50W halogen backup bulbs you see in the parts stores! 50W is wayy too much current draw (100% overload!) for the stock wiring and switch, they produce way too much heat for safety near plastic lenses, and the filament's in the wrong place so the reflector doesn't work correctly with them. The 796s work great, and you finally get to see where you're going when backing at night.

Amber bulbs are a special case. The amber coating "steals" some of the light, so the output is lower. The bright filament inside an 1157A or 1157NA produces 32 candlepower, but what comes through the amber coating is 24 candlepower. Unfortunately, there's no amber equivalent of the Honda bulb for use in park/turn lights that have clear lenses. The next best thing is 2357NA, which draws about the same current as an 1157 and produces 30 candlepower despite the amber coating. 2357NA as well as their non-amber 2357 counterparts are less expensive than the Honda bulbs, but they don't have the anti-corrosion nickel-plated base or the Krypton gas fill, so they tend to blacken sooner than other bulbs if used in "bright" mode for prolonged periods (e.g. using a 2357 in brake lamp service). The 2357NA works fine in front park/turn service because turn signal service is short and intermittent, which limits bulb blackening and makes overall bulb life acceptable.

The '68-'71 sidemarker lamps can be made about 60% brighter with Osram № 3886X bulbs, which also fit directly in place of the 1895, 57, and 53 used in instrument cluster lights that take the metal bayonet-base bulbs. The '72-up sidemarker lights and '66-up instrument cluster lights take the all-glass wedge-base bulb. The Osram № 2886X is the one, about 75% brighter than a 194, 60% brighter than a 168. These are tough to find in North America; send me a PM if you're after them.

If your car has the little turn signal indicators mounted on top of the fenders, and one or both of them no longer flash, you can either spend $3.40 apiece at Year One for a replacement bulb with a plain brass base, or you can spend $10.60 and get a 10-pack of 'em with corrosionproof nickel-plated bases.

Flashing front sidemarkers
Another cool and useful (and legal) upgrade is to make the front amber sidemarker lights on '70-up cars do double-duty as turn signal blinkers so pedestrians, cyclists and drivers in the next lane or cross street can see you signalling. If they aren't already wired this way, it's usually simple to make the change, see here. This can be done on '68 cars, but it's tougher because the early sidemarkers use only one wire and get their ground via body sheetmetal. This can be worked around, but it's more effort.

3rd central brake light
This is actually a really good safety device, though there was no shortage of grumbling when it was first introduced in 1986 in North America. It lets drivers behind you see you apply the brake earlier, and lets the drivers behind *them* see you do it, too. This is especially valuable for cars that have small/dim brake lights...'71-'73 Darts, among others. See the Allpar article. From the '80s through the mid '90s, the market was flooded with cruddy retrofit kits that were of very poor quality, looked ugly and had failure-prone logic modules that allowed easy (but failure prone) hookup to cars like ours, which have the brake lamp and turn signal function combined in one lamp. Most of us probably remember seeing an older American car with one of these junk retrofits...they never worked right. They'd blink with the left or right signals, or they'd be on when the brakes were off and off when the brakes were on, etc. Yuck. A good center brake light works well and doesn't really detract from the appearance of the car, but proper installation requires running one new wire from the brake lamp switch to the back of the car. This isn't very hard, all it involves is the wire itself, a piggyback terminal and removal of the left sill plates (which exposes the channel through which all the front-to-rear wiring runs).

If you install a central 3rd brake light, don't fall for the idea of putting a gadget on it that makes it blink/flash/strobe/"pulse". These are out there on the aftermarket, hyped as a "safety" upgrade (with zero basis in actual fact) and it seems like a common-sense kind of thing, but these gadgets do the opposite of what is claimed. The reason why car signal lights are standardized in their color, position, operation, etc. is so they transmit a clear, immediate message to other drivers. If you monkey with the operation of a car signal light, you force the driver behind you to figure out what your car's lights are trying to say. It might "only" take a fraction of a second, but at speed a fraction of a second's hesitation in applying the brakes can easily make the difference between a horn-honk and a crash. Just don't!

Daytime running lights
Opinions run high in the car enthusiast community. Some people are very enthusiastic haters of daytime running lights. Fact is, DRLs work: if your car has them, you're less likely to be in a crash. Moreover, just like with the 3rd brake light, you're significantly more likely to be hit if your old car doesn't have one. Most arguments against DRLs are legitimate, solid beefs about the problems caused by particular kinds of DRLs, not the concept itself.

Headlamp-based DRLs, both high and low beam, are very common in North America. They make a lot of problems: too much glare, too much fuel to run, they eat up expensive headlight bulbs, and they make the turn signals harder to see in daytime. And just turn on your headlamps during the day, either manually or automatically, isn't a good solution either. It increases fuel and bulb consumption, and because the taillamps are on it reduces the visual contrast between "not braking" and "Braking" conditions as your car is viewed from the rear.

Parking lamps are not DRLs; they're not anywhere near bright enough and the light isn't distributed through the right range of angles. And there's the brake/tail light issue, too.

For retrofit purposes, the best implementation is the full-time operation of the front directional signals (except, of course, when they are operating as signals). Chrysler has used this kind of DRL on some vehicles over the last twenty years, and you can enable it on any car with an easily-installed module -- see the Allpar article.

LED retrofits

Until recently, the options were pathetic-joke "LED bulbs" or unsafe (but still costly) LED "panels" with or without custom taillights. Fortunately, the situation has changed for the better lately. There's still a mountain of unsafe garbage on the market, all of it marketed as an "upgrade", but now there are legitimate LED bulbs that actually work, with real optical engineering in them. Detailed info here. The ones to use in the brake/tail lights are these. For the backup/reverse lights (and amber-lens turn signals that take a single-filament bulb, not many old Mopars have these in North America) use these. There are these that work well in some front turn signals but not others; whether it's a yes or a no depends on what kind of optics your front turn signals use -- and that depends on the model and year. Generally if there's a bowl-shaped reflector behind/surrounding the bulb, it's a yes, but if there's just a box (housing) surrounding the bulb and the lens has circular optics spreading out from a central "bullseye", then it's no.Don't mess with "load resistors" (good way to louse up the reliability of the system), instead put in a flasher configured to work with LEDs.

(By the way: whether or not they work OK is not a matter of peering at a light and going "Yep, looks nice and bright to me!". It's all objective and very detailed. There are specifications for minimum and maximum intensity, for each different function, through a large range of horizontal and vertical angles. That's to make sure that not only can the guy directly behind you see and recognise your brake lamps as brake lamps when he's sitting at about the same height as you, but so can the guy in the next lane over to the left, sitting down low in his Corvette...and so can the guy in the next lane over to the right, sitting way up high in his semi truck...and so can the guy on the on-ramp in his SUV. There are also specifications for the minimum intensity ratio, again through a large range of H and V angles, between functions that share a lit compartment (brake/tail, for instance, or park/turn). That's so that your taillamps can't be mistaken for brake lamps, or your brake lamps for taillamps. There are specifications for minimum projected active illuminated surface area, to make sure that the lamps, when lit, are "big" enough to do a reliable job of grabbing attention and quickly and accurately conveying the intended message. "Lights up red when I step on the brake" really is not good enough.

And there is an additional issue with LEDs that is only addressed effectively with the legitimate bulbs: Heat. Everyone knows LEDs produce hardly any heat, right? Wrong! LEDs are commonly considered to be low-heat devices due to the public's familiarity with small, low-output LEDs used for electronic control panels and other applications requiring only modest amounts of light. However, LEDs actually produce a significant amount of heat per unit of light output. Rather than being emitted together with the light as is the case with conventional light bulbs, an LED's heat is produced at the rear of the emitters. The difficulty is that LEDs' light output is extremely variable depending on temperature, with many types producing at 30° C (85° F) only 60% of the rated light output they produce at an emitter junction temperature 16° C (60° F). Take one hot day...add one traffic jam with extended brake light "on" time...and the LED-retrofit trinkets' output will drop to such a degree that the lamp assembly will no longer produce minimally adequate safety performance. Anybody can dream up a brand name and spend money to promote it—very few have the resources to actually make a product that works effectively and safely.

It's great that we finally have ones that work well. The advantages are big: much less current draw through our old/thin wires, instant light-up to give the driver behind more time to react, and on cars like the '64-'66 Barracuda and Valiant you no longer have a hot filament underneath the lens, heating it up and melting a divot in it. But the magic's no good if the optics are wrong; stick to the legitimate ones.


I guess that's enough rambling for now...if I've left anything out, I'm sure someone will ask about it.

_________________
一期一会
Too many people who were born on third base actually believe they've hit a triple.

Image


Top
   
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2016 6:31 am 
Offline
Turbo EFI
User avatar

Joined: Wed Mar 25, 2009 5:56 pm
Posts: 1295
Location: TEXAS
Car Model*:
THANKS Dan! Great Post! Very excited about the Honda Bulbs!


THIS SHOULD BE A STICKY!

_________________
1964 Dart GT


Top
   
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2016 8:52 am 
Offline
3 Deuce Webber
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2006 7:45 pm
Posts: 56
Location: Washington
Car Model*:
And a big thanks from me too. The information you provide not only has helped me in correcting lighting issues but in upgrades/improvements that I didn't even know were available.


Top
   
PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2016 11:01 am 
Offline
Board Sponsor

Joined: Wed Oct 23, 2002 7:57 pm
Posts: 5981
Location: Waynesboro, Pa.
Car Model*: 65 Valiant 2Dr Post
Thanks for all the great info Dan!

One further question I have is this. For those of us that use our trucks to tow trailers, are there any upgrades or tips we should use for the added lighting loads? Wiring upgrades needed or bulbs that may lessen the current draw?

Rick

_________________
2 Mopars come with Spark plug tubes. One is a highly refined, world class, racing machine. The other is a 426 CI. boat anchor!
Image
Image


Top
   
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2016 1:31 pm 
Offline
Board Sponsor & Contributor

Joined: Thu Oct 31, 2002 5:39 pm
Posts: 23236
Location: North America
Car Model*:
Glad to help out. Truth be told, in most cases I'd go for the linked Philips LEDs instead of the Honda bulbs. They cost more, but they're more cost-effective (never burn out, etc).

_________________
一期一会
Too many people who were born on third base actually believe they've hit a triple.

Image


Top
   
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2016 2:06 pm 
Offline
Turbo EFI
User avatar

Joined: Fri Feb 28, 2003 6:55 pm
Posts: 1048
Location: Strasburg, VA
Car Model*:
I would like to convert the single terminal B/U lights on my 65 Dart to function as amber turn signals. Can you recommend a LED or upgraded bulb?

_________________
65 Dart station wagon slant 6 - now under construction
47 Dodge Custom 4 Door sedan
87 D100 Short Bed slant 6

Retired USAF 1966-1986
Retired US Postal Service 2004-2014


Top
   
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2016 3:33 pm 
Offline
Board Sponsor & Contributor

Joined: Thu Oct 31, 2002 5:39 pm
Posts: 23236
Location: North America
Car Model*:
65 dartman wrote:
I would like to convert the single terminal B/U lights on my 65 Dart to function as amber turn signals. Can you recommend a LED or upgraded bulb?


I experimented with exactly that on my own '65 years ago. The optics for a backup light aren't really the same as those for a turn signal; you'd want to pick up a sheet of diffuser material for in-ceiling fluorescent lights -- this stuff with the 3/16" pointy prisms, cut a piece to fit exactly your reverse light lenses, and affix it to the inside of the lens.

Bulb: you could go with a 1295NA. Tough to get hold of a good amber LED that'll work acceptably. You could try experimenting with this white one to see if you can get adequate intensity and light distribution; if so, paint the inside of your lens with this stuff and go ahead and keep using those white LEDs. If you don't want to do that, you want the lenses to keep looking white but light up amber, and the white LED gave acceptable intensity/distribution, then get the amber version of it (very good, but costly to buy; it's this one; you'll have to file down one of its index pins on the base for it to fit in your socket.

Wire 'em up Australian style to keep your backup light function while gaining the amber indicators.

_________________
一期一会
Too many people who were born on third base actually believe they've hit a triple.

Image


Top
   
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2016 6:29 pm 
Offline
Turbo EFI
User avatar

Joined: Wed Mar 25, 2009 5:56 pm
Posts: 1295
Location: TEXAS
Car Model*:
SlantSixDan wrote:
Truth be told, in most cases I'd go for the linked Philips LEDs instead of the Honda bulbs.


The Philips LED 's are listed as coming from CANADA! Dan, can we trust Canadians? :lol: Thanks Again! Always appreciate your info. :D

_________________
1964 Dart GT


Top
   
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2016 7:44 pm 
Offline
Board Sponsor & SL6 Racer
User avatar

Joined: Fri Nov 08, 2002 4:48 pm
Posts: 5880
Location: Burton BC canada
Car Model*:
Canada is an excellent 3 rd world country with multicoloured money and daytime running lights. All comedians are Canadian ....all Canadians are comedians. We say zed not zee. We have a 3 party Federal system. No Pistols, no lawsuits, no alligators. Kilometers , Kilograms , Kilobytes. Our leader is a hippie who boxes but our real boss is the Queen.....We have 3 coasts, 5 time zones and not one Interstate. You dont need a passport to come here...but you need one to leave. Loonies and Toonies. Our national symbol is a Beaver. Yes!....that kind of Beaver!

.......but untrustworthy. We tricked America into losing the last 2 wars with us.....and America hasnt tried again since. We sent you Justin Beiber and Celine Dion.....and now you have to keep them!

_________________
Yeah....Im the one who destroyed this rare, vintage automobile.....

Image


Top
   
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2016 9:29 pm 
Offline
Board Sponsor & Contributor

Joined: Thu Oct 31, 2002 5:39 pm
Posts: 23236
Location: North America
Car Model*:
sandy in BC wrote:
Canada is an excellent 3 rd world country with multicoloured money and daytime running lights. All comedians are Canadian ....all Canadians are comedians. We say zed not zee. We have a 3 party Federal system. No Pistols, no lawsuits, no alligators. Kilometers , Kilograms , Kilobytes. Our leader is a hippie who boxes but our real boss is the Queen.....We have 3 coasts, 5 time zones and not one Interstate. You dont need a passport to come here...but you need one to leave. Loonies and Toonies. Our national symbol is a Beaver. Yes!....that kind of Beaver!

.......but untrustworthy. We tricked America into losing the last 2 wars with us.....and America hasnt tried again since. We sent you Justin Beiber and Celine Dion.....and now you have to keep them!


Yeah, what ⬆︎he⬆︎ said.

_________________
一期一会
Too many people who were born on third base actually believe they've hit a triple.

Image


Top
   
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 21, 2016 8:58 am 
Offline
Board Sponsor

Joined: Wed Oct 23, 2002 7:57 pm
Posts: 5981
Location: Waynesboro, Pa.
Car Model*: 65 Valiant 2Dr Post
Quote:
For those of us that use our trucks to tow trailers, are there any upgrades or tips we should use for the added lighting loads? Wiring upgrades needed or bulbs that may lessen the current draw?


Any thought on this question Dan?

Thanks

_________________
2 Mopars come with Spark plug tubes. One is a highly refined, world class, racing machine. The other is a 426 CI. boat anchor!
Image
Image


Top
   
PostPosted: Fri Dec 29, 2017 5:19 pm 
Offline
EFI Slant 6
User avatar

Joined: Fri Sep 01, 2006 4:09 am
Posts: 392
Location: Tolland, Ct. 06084
Car Model*: 65 Dart, 225, 4 spd od, hyd clutch, BBD, 2 1/4 exh
Any LED recommended for the inner 65 dart taillights that have a single filament?

_________________
1965 Dart 110k, 225, Carter BBD Super Six, 2 1/4 single exh., sbp manual scarebird front disc, 7 1/4 rear 2.94 sure grip, 14 x 4.5 OEM wheels, 833 OD with hyd. throwout bearing, HEI, electric fan, ram air/heated air, Accusump. http://plymouthcarclub.com/


Top
   
 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Sat Dec 30, 2017 5:32 am 
Online
SL6 Racer & Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2002 12:06 pm
Posts: 7245
Location: Silver Springs, Fl.
Car Model*:
Rick Covalt wrote:
Quote:
For those of us that use our trucks to tow trailers, are there any upgrades or tips we should use for the added lighting loads? Wiring upgrades needed or bulbs that may lessen the current draw?


Any thought on this question Dan?

Thanks


Rick, If you use LED builds on the trailer, you will have very little additional load on the truck. I converted my trailer several years ago.

_________________
Charrlie_S
65 Valiant 100 2dr post 170 turbo
66 Valiant Signet 225 nitrous
64 Valiant Signet
64 Valiant 4dr 170


Top
   
PostPosted: Sat Dec 30, 2017 6:25 am 
Offline
Board Sponsor

Joined: Wed Oct 23, 2002 7:57 pm
Posts: 5981
Location: Waynesboro, Pa.
Car Model*: 65 Valiant 2Dr Post
Thanks Charlie. Not to worry, the truck and trailer burned to the ground 18 months ago when I asked the question!! :D :D Just kidding of course. :lol:

_________________
2 Mopars come with Spark plug tubes. One is a highly refined, world class, racing machine. The other is a 426 CI. boat anchor!
Image
Image


Top
   
PostPosted: Sat Dec 30, 2017 12:51 pm 
Offline
Board Sponsor & Contributor

Joined: Thu Oct 31, 2002 5:39 pm
Posts: 23236
Location: North America
Car Model*:
DonPal wrote:
Any LED recommended for the inner 65 dart taillights that have a single filament?


There is no completely suitable (effective, safe, correct-intensity) LED bulb for the '65-'66 Dart inner tail lamp. For that matter, the correct incandescent bulb has grown very difficult to get hold of, too. There are many that will fit and light up, but most of them are either too bright (makes the inner taillight look like a brake light) or too dim (inner tail looks faulty versus outer tail). One thing you might try: see if the outer-type socket will fit the inner reflector, with this bulb or this bulb (specifically one of those, not another type) installed. If so, get another outer-type socket and tap its extra wire into the outer socket's bright-mode (brake/turn) wire. Do not use the common fold-over-and-crunch Scotchlok type taps. Use Posi-Taps (product here, review here). If you get the linked assortment, you'll surely find uses for them—they're one of those products that you buy for a particular project, but then other uses for them keep popping up in front of you once you have them.

_________________
一期一会
Too many people who were born on third base actually believe they've hit a triple.

Image


Top
   
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 19 posts ]  Go to page 1 2 Next

All times are UTC-07:00


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Limited